Nutritious Picks from King Kullen

Picking nutritious foods is the key to healthy eating. Below you’ll find a bevy of info on what foods are great for you and why so you can make the best choices while shopping for you and your family.


Apples

  • Apples do not have fat, cholesterol or sodium
  • Apples do have lots of fiber – both soluble and insoluble fiber. Apples are especially rich in pectin, a soluble fiber, which is effective in lowering cholesterol levels.
  • Apples contain small amounts of potassium

Nutrition Facts for 1 medium apple, only (154g/5.5oz.): 80 calories; 22 g carbohydrate; 0 fat; 0 sodium; 5 g dietary fiber; 8% DV vitamin C; 170 mg potassium


Asparagus

Asparagus is a dieter’s delight at only 25 calories for 5 spears. Asparagus must be cooked. To prepare, cut off and discard tough ends. Steam lightly or roast: preheat oven to 450 degrees. Wrap asparagus in foil and cook 10 minutes or until tender.

  • There are only 4 calories per medium spear.
  • Asparagus is a good source of potassium and vitamin C. It also provides 2 to 3 grams of fiber per serving.
  • Asparagus has more folic acid than any other vegetable. Just one ½ cup serving provides more than half of the recommended daily allowance of folic acid.
  • According to the National Cancer Institute, asparagus is a good source of glutathione, a potent cancer fighter.

Roasted Asparagus
If you have never roasted asparagus, this is something you have to try. The result is delicious! Roasting makes the asparagus more flavorful and sweeter. Wash and trim fresh asparagus spears. Spread spears on a large rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle spears with olive oil and roll them around to coat lightly. Roast medium-thick spears in a preheated 450°F oven about 15 minutes; thin ones about 10 minutes, occasionally shaking the pan to roll them around for even browning. Test with a fork to determine doneness. Spears should be tender throughout and lightly browned.

Nutrition Facts (5 asparagus spears 93g): 25 calories, 4 g carbohydrate , 2 g dietary fiber, 2 g protein, 10 percent DV vitamin A, 15 percent DV vitamin C, 30 percent DV folate.


Baby Peeled Carrots

Carrots are an excellent source of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene, a member of the carotenoid family is a precursor to vitamin A. In plants, carotenoids function to protect the plant from oxidation and act as a pigment to aid the plant in light absorption. In humans, carotenoids function to prevent oxidation and have been shown to enhance the immune system and prevent cancer and heart disease.

Beta-carotene is the most familiar carotenoid, but there are over 500 known carotenoids. These substances give fruits and vegetables their rich colors, and are generally red, orange, and deep yellow. For example, sweet potatoes, winter squash, carrots, apricots, papayas are all rich in carotenoids. Broccoli and dark, leafy greens are also excellent sources of carotenoids.


Bananas

  • Bananas are one of our best sources of potassium, an essential mineral for maintaining normal blood pressure and heart function. Since the average banana contains a whopping 467 mg of potassium and only 1 mg of sodium, a banana a day may help to prevent high blood pressure and protect against heart disease.
  • Bananas have long been recognized for their antacid effects.
  • Bananas are an exceptionally rich source of fructooligosaccharide, a compound called a prebiotic because it nourishes probiotic (friendly) bacteria in the colon. These beneficial bacteria produce vitamins and digestive enzymes that improve our ability to absorb nutrients, plus compounds that protect us against unfriendly microorganisms.
  • Ripeness: When fully ripe, there should be no remaining green. The color for peak ripeness is yellow. The peel of red bananas darkens as the fruit ripens.
  • Preparation: Peel right before eating. To prevent browning, sprinkle with citrus juice (lemon or orange juice).
  • Serving: Bananas are most popular raw, but can be baked, steamed, broiled or sautéed.
  • Season: Year-Round
  • Storing: Store at room temperature. To speed ripening, store bananas in a brown paper bag. Very ripe bananas will keep a few days in the refrigerator. (The skin will turn brown, but the pulp will be fine.) Peeled bananas will freeze for about 2 months.
  • Recipe: Halve banana lengthwise, then sprinkle with cinnamon, grated ginger and lemon juice. Broil for 4 minutes.
  • Nutrition: Bananas are nutritious and high in potassium. Bananas contain some vitamin C and iron.
  • 1 medium banana (4.5 oz) = 110 calories, 29 g carbohydrate, 400 mg potassium, 4 g fiber, 15 percent DV vitamin C.

Blueberries

One cup of blueberries contains 16 percent Daily Value of fiber (2.86 g per 100g) (90 percent of the fiber is insoluble, good for the digestive track) Blueberries are a source of Vitamins A and C, potassium and folic acid. Blueberries are very low in fat and sodium.
Blueberries are the fruits of a shrub and grow in clusters. They range in size from that of a pea to a marble. They are deep in color, from blue to purple-black, and have a white waxy “bloom” that covers the surface for protection.
Wash berries just prior to use to not prematurely remove the protective bloom that resides on the skin’s surface. The skin surrounds flesh that encases tiny seeds.
Blueberries are bursting with nutrients and flavor, yet very low in calories. Researchers at Tufts University analyzed 60 fruits and vegetables for their antioxidant capability. Blueberries came out on top, rating highest in their capacity to destroy free radicals.
For an elegant New Year’s Eve dessert, layer yogurt and blueberries in wine glasses and top with morsels of dark chocolate.
1 cup fresh blueberries = 70 calories, 1 gram protein, 15 g carbohydrate, 0 fat, 23 percent daily value vitamin C, 6.5 grams dietary fiber.

Blueberries are a SUPERFRUIT, brimming with antioxidants.

  • One serving of Blueberries = one-half cup
  • One serving of Blueberry juice = 3/4 cup (6 oz.) of 100 percent juice
  • One serving of dried Blueberries = 1/4 cup

Broccoli Crowns

The jewel of the “veggie kingdom”, 1 stalk of broccoli provides 220 percent of our daily value of vitamin C; 15 percent of our daily value of vitamin A (beta-carotene); 20 percent of our daily value of fiber and is rich in natural phytochemicals known to reduce the risk of many diseases. Broccoli also contains calcium and iron.

Consume a sufficient amount of fruits and vegetables while staying within energy needs. Two cups of fruit and 2½ cups of vegetables per day are recommended for a reference 2,000-calorie intake, with higher or lower amounts depending on the calorie level.

Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables each day. In particular, select from all five vegetable subgroups (dark green, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables, and other vegetables) several times a week.

Nutrition Facts for broccoli, 1 medium stalk (148 g / 5.3 oz.): 45 calories, 5g protein, 0.5g fat, 8g carbohydrate, 5g dietary fiber, 55mg sodium, excellent source vitamin C.


Broccoli Rabe

Choose: Broccoli rabe that is firm, with small stems, few buds and open flowers.
To Store: Wrap and refrigerate.
To Prepare: Rinse and shake off excess water; cut off any rough bottoms
Nutritional Benefits:

  • Low Sodium
  • High in the antioxidant Vitamin A
  • High in the antioxidant Vitamin C
  • Good Source of Potassium
  • Good Source of Folate

1 cup (40 grams) chopped broccoli rabe = 9 calories, 1 g carbohydrate, 1 g dietary fiber, 1 g protein, 13 mg sodium, 21 percent daily value vitamin A, 13 percent daily value vitamin C.


California Cherries

FROM STEMILT GROWERS
1 cup (21 cherries, 140 grams) = 90 calories, 0.5 g fat, 2 g protein, 22 g carbohydrate (19 g sugar, 3 g dietary fiber), 15 percent vitamin C, 2 percent vitamin A, 2 percent calcium and iron.

Cherries with the stems intact will have a longer shelf life than those without stems. Store unwashed cherries in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, and wash before eating. For optimum flavor, before eating fresh sweet cherries, leave them at room temperature for 1-2 hours. Fresh cherries should be consumed within 2-4 days. Allow one cup serving of cherries per person and buy extra for the kids! You can freeze fresh cherries, but they should be pitted first, otherwise they will take on an off flavor from the pit. Cherry juice can stain, so be careful when pitting them. They can be pitted and frozen in plastic bags with the air removed, or freeze separated cherries on a cookie sheet and then pack in bags for freezing.


Cantaloupe

Sweet, Juicy and High in Vitamins A and C, cantaloupe, is full of nutrients.
¼-medium cantaloupe is only 50 calories, 12 grams carbohydrate, naturally fat free, cholesterol free, very low in sodium and a good source of folate.
Cantaloupe is on the Top Ten Nutritionists’ Pick List!

  • Wash the rind before slicing. Serve in half, quarters or diced into a fruit salad.
  • Store at room temperature for 2-3 days to further ripen.
  • Choose cantaloupes heavy for their size with a fruity fragrance.

¼ medium cantaloupe (4.8 oz./134g)= 50 calories; 12 g carbohydrate, 1 g protein, 0 fat, 1 g dietary fiber, 11 g sugar, 100 percent DV vitamin A, 80 percent DV vitamin C.


Clementines

Clementines, imported from Spain, are the delight of a cool fall day.
Sweet and virtually seedless, clementines are the smallest of “mandarin” oranges. Sometimes called “kid-glove” oranges, you could eat the fruit without soiling your hands… they are that easy to peel!
In season: Mid-October to February.
Storage: Refrigerate for about a week.
Available in 5-pound crates, buy more than you think you’ll need, because they will be devoured like peanuts. They make a great gift!
Serve: Keep these beauties in a bowl, for any drop-in guests, or as a garnish with fish or poultry. Recipe-wise, use clementines instead of other citrus.
Nutrition: Good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and fiber.
A sweet and nutritious 35-calorie snack!


Earthbound Farm Baby Peeled Carrots

Why is there a “white blush” on peeled baby carrots?
This occurs because of the process of abrasion peeling to produce the peeled baby carrots. This process results in the formation of a grayish white film on the surface of the carrots.
1 large baby carrot (15 grams) = 5 calories, 0 fat, 1.2 grams carbohydrate, 0.3 grams dietary fiber, 0.1 gram protein, 12 mg sodium, 41 percent Daily Value for vitamin A, 2 percent Daily Value for vitamin C.


Florida Corn

When you reach for those tempting ears of fresh sweet corn in the produce aisle, you’ll be pleased to know that medical researchers approve of your choice. Corn, it turns out, is one of the very best dietary sources of two antioxidant carotenoids–cousins of Vitamin A—called lutein and zeaxanthin. Like other carotenoids, they seem to play a role in preventing heart disease and cancer. But in addition, several recent studies have shown that a high intake of lutein and zeaxanthin (pronounced zee-uh-zanthin) is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of a chronic eye disease called macular degeneration.
Nutrition Facts for Sweet Corn (kernels from 1 medium ear (90g/3.2 oz.) = 80 calories; 1 g fat; 0 sodium; 240 mg potassium; 18 g carbohydrate; 3 g dietary fiber; 3 g protein; Good source of vitamin C.
Nutrition: High fiber, very low sodium, low fat, a good source of vitamin C, contains iron, vitamin A, and some of the B vitamins.


Green Cabbage

A member of the Brassica family, cabbage is related to kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. The most common cabbages are green and red cabbage. Cabbage contains vitamin C, fiber and cancer fighting compounds.
Green Cabbage

The heart of any good coleslaw is shredded green cabbage, which, in the supermarket, looks similar to a head of iceberg lettuce – green, round and typically a little smaller than a volleyball. Green is the most common type of cabbage and is popular for its crunchiness and mild flavor. When looking for a head of green cabbage, look for one that is heavy for its size and has no discoloration.
Cabbage Measurements

1/4 pound cooked cabbage equals one serving One medium head (about two pounds) cabbage equals four to six servings or six to eight cups shredded
Storing

Store all varieties of cabbage tightly wrapped in the refrigerator for up to one week.
Cabbage, raw 1 cup shredded (70 grams): 17 calories, 2 grams dietary fiber, 120 IU Vitamin A, 23 mg Vitamin C, 172 mg potassium, 30 micrograms folate.


Honeydew Melons

Nutrition Facts for 1/10th of a medium honeydew melon (134g/4.8 oz) = 50 calories, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, 35 mg sodium, 13 g CHO, 1 g protein, 1g fiber, 2percent DV vitamin A, 45percent DV vitamin C and 2percent DV iron.

  • Melons belong to the gourd family
  • Honeydew’s greenish-white rind turns creamy when ripe and has a slight aroma
  • To ripen, place whole melons inside a loosely closed brown paper bag. They will also ripen at room temperature.
  • Once cut, melons won’t ripen. Refrigerate cut melons or fully ripe whole melons.

Serving Ideas:

  • Add melon to cereal or fruit salad
  • Top with ginger, lemon, lime or sherry
  • Melon can accompany meat, poultry, and seafood.
  • Serve melon with vegetable salads, rice salads and chicken salads.

How to Roast Fresh Chestnuts

Roasting chestnuts in the oven is simple. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Rinse the chestnuts then pat them dry. Use a strong, sharp paring knife to cut an “X” in the flat side of the chestnut shells. This allows the steam to escape and makes it easier to peel them. Place the chestnuts in a single layer on a shallow baking pan. Roast for 20 minutes and turn them over after about 10 minutes. The sliced part of the shells will curl back. Place the hot chestnuts in a towel-lined bowl. Tightly cover them for about 10 minutes before removing the shells. They should be cool enough to handle. Starting at the slit, pull the shell away from the nutmeat. The inside skin will peel away from the chestnut along with the outer shell. Serve plain or sprinkle with cinnamon if desired. Enjoy this festive and healthful treat!

4 ounces cooked chestnuts = 149 calories, 1.6 grams fat, 5.7 grams dietary fiber, 2 grams protein, 32 grams carbohydrate, 31 mg sodium, 30 mg vitamin C, 811 mg potassium.


Idaho Potatoes

Avoid potatoes with wrinkled skins, soft dark spots, cut surfaces, or green appearance.
Store: On countertop or in dark cool area, do not refrigerate
Reduce cancer-risk by eating with more fruits and vegetables

  • Keep the skin on when cooking, to preserve the potatoes abundant nutrition.
  • Best to bake without wrapping in foil, otherwise it will steam.
  • Save the water used to steam potatoes and add it to sauces, soups or gravies. This is because some nutrients leach into the water and we don’t want to toss them out.
  • Store potatoes in a cool dark place with an optimal temperature of 50 degrees. Do not refrigerate because temperatures cooler than 45 degrees converts potato starch to sugar, which changes the taste.

1 medium potato (148 grams/5.3 ounces)= 100 calories, 0 fat, 0 sodium, 720 mg potassium, 26 g carbohydrate (3 g sugar), 3 g dietary fiber, excellent source of vitamin C.


Long Island Bi-Color Corn

Local, fresh produce from out community, supporting our farmers!
Nutrition Notes: Corn is a high fiber, low fat food with a fair amount of vitamin A (if the corn is yellow). Naturally low-sodium and high potassium, it contains iron, vitamin C and some of the B vitamins.
Nutrition Facts: 1 medium Ear of Sweet Corn (3.2 oz./90 g): 80 Calories, 3 grams Protein, 1 gram Fat (0 Saturated), 13 mg Sodium, 18 g Carbohydrate, 3 grams Dietary Fiber, 10% Daily Value Vitamin C.
Recipe: To grill corn, take a few ears of corn with the husks still on and remove the silk. Soak the ears of corn in water for about 30 minutes. Then place the corn, stalks and all, on the grill for five to ten minutes. Roll around to cook evenly.


Long Island Cauliflower

There are few other foods that are as rich in essential vitamins, vital minerals and medicinal value as the cruciferous vegetable family (cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable). There is medical evidence that because of their wide-ranging nutritional benefits, they are powerful antidotes to cancer.
Cauliflower will keep for up to five days if stored in the crisper section of the refrigerator. If the head is not purchased wrapped, store it in an open or perforated plastic bag. Keep the head stem-side up to prevent moisture form collecting on it. For the best flavor, cauliflower should be eaten as soon as possible. Precut florets do not keep well, and they are best when eaten within a day of purchase.
1/6 medium head cauliflower (99 grams, 3.5 ounces) = 25 calories, 30 mg sodium, 270 mg potassium, 5 g carbohydrates, 2 g dietary fiber, 100 percent Daily Value for vitamin C.


Long Island Potatoes

Avoid potatoes with wrinkled skins, soft dark spots, cut surfaces, or green appearance.
Store: On countertop or in dark cool area, do not refrigerate
Reduce cancer-risk by eating with more fruits and vegetables
1 medium potato (148 grams/5.3 ounces)= 100 calories, 0 fat, 0 sodium, 720 mg potassium, 26 g carbohydrate (3 g sugar), 3 g dietary fiber, excellent source of vitamin C.
28 percent of the daily value for vitamin C, Good source of B vitamins including folic acid, B6 and niacin, Contains many minerals including copper, zinc, potassium and magnesium.


Mangos

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that healthy adults consume 5 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables every day (based on a daily consumption of 1,200 to 3,200 total calories). Why not make one of those a mango? The versatile mango is available year round and adds delicious flavor to a balanced diet.

  • Mangos are an excellent source of vitamins C and A, both important antioxidant nutrients. Vitamin C promotes healthy immune function and collagen formation. Vitamin A is important for vision and bone growth.
  • Mangos are a good source of dietary fiber. Diets low in fat and high in fiber-containing grain products, fruits, and vegetables may be associated with a reduced risk of some types of cancer.
  • Mangos contain over 20 different vitamins and minerals.
  • 1 cup sliced mango (165 grams) = 110 calories, 0 fat, 0 sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 28 g carbohydrate, 80 percent DV for vitamin C, 25 percent DV for vitamin A.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are the only natural fresh vegetable or fruit with vitamin D; a serving of 4-5 white button mushrooms provides 15 IU (4 percent of the Daily Value).
Mushrooms are low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free and very low in sodium, yet they provide several nutrients, including riboflavin, niacin and selenium.
MUSHROOM RISOTTO

    • 1-Tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
    • 1 shallot, chopped
    • 6 ounces mushrooms, sliced-On Sale
    • ¾ cup Arborio rice
    • 3 ½ cups Health Valley or Imagine Broth (Vegetable or Mushroom)
    • 2 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley, chopped
    • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

In a large saucepan, heat oil and add shallot and mushrooms, cook over moderate heat, 3-4 minutes (stirring occasionally). Stir in rice and cook 1 minute. Pour in 1-cup broth and cook over moderate heat and stir constantly until liquid is absorbed. Add remaining broth, ½ cup at a time, stirring after each addition until liquid has been absorbed. Rice is ready when grains are soft and mixture is creamy, about 25 minutes. Add parsley and Parmesan cheese.
Per serving: 330 calories, 12 g fat, 38 g carbohydrate, 1 g dietary fiber, 17 g protein, 213 mg calcium.


Navel Oranges

Navel Orange Facts

  • Choose oranges that are firm and heavy for their size.
  • The rind is thick and easy to peel. Its pulp is sweet, juicy and almost always seedless.
  • Store at room temperature for about 1 week; otherwise keep in the refrigerator.
  • Oranges yield the most juice at room temperature.
  • Known for high vitamin C and a good source of potassium. An orange has a whopping 7 grams of fiber!
  • Oranges are diuretic and digestive.

Organic Gala Apples

Apples provide about 7 to 8 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C, and they offer much more. Apples are a good source of dietary fiber and a major source of several antioxidant phytochemicals. Studies suggest that these natural substances found in apples may prevent cell damage that leads to cancer, and may prevent damage to blood vessels that leads to heart disease. It is important to eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy lifestyle.
1 medium apple (154 grams/5.5 ounces) = 80 calories, 0 fat, 0 protein, 0 sodium, 22 g carbohydrate, 5 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar, 8 percent daily value vitamin C, 170 mg potassium


Gala or Granny Smith Apples

EAT AN “An Apple a Day”
Phytochemicals found in apples may fight some types of cancers, help reduce cholesterol damage and promote healthy lungs.
Nutrition Facts for 1 medium apple, only
(154g/5.5oz.): 80 calories; 22 g carbohydrate; 0 fat; 0 sodium; 5 g dietary fiber; 8% DV vitamin C; 170 mg potassium
SIMPLY MICROWAVED APPLES, serves 2
INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 medium (about 6 to 8 oz. each) apples, STEMILT
  • 4 tablespoons all-fruit preserves
  • 2 tablespoons apple juice

Pare top third of apple and core. Arrange apples in microwave-safe baking dish. Fill centers with preserves. Pour juice in bottom of dish and cover with a microwave-safe lid. Microwave at HIGH for 4-5 minutes or until apples are tender.


Peaches

Choose bright, fresh-looking peaches. Skin color should be creamy or yellow with varying degrees of red blush or mottling, depending on the variety. Ripe peaches should yield to gentle palm pressure. If unripe, leave peaches on the countertop in a closed paper bag. If ripe, refrigerate. Peaches continue to ripen after harvest. Peaches are naturally:

  • Saturated Fat Free
  • Sodium Free
  • Cholesterol Free
  • Good Source of the antioxidant Vitamin C
  • Fat Free

Serving Size 1 medium peach (98g): Calories 40, Total Fat 0g, Total Carbohydrate 10g, Dietary Fiber 2g, Sugars 9g, Protein 1g, Vitamin C: 10 percent, Vitamin A: 2 percent, Calcium: 0 percent, Iron: 0 percent.


Spinach

Each one cup serving of cooked spinach provides 140 percent of a day’s vitamin A, 30 percent of a day’s folic acid, 15 percent of a day’s iron and 15 percent of a day’s vitamin C … all for only 20 fat-free calories!
Steam spinach and dress it up with garlic and lemon juice; or serve it raw with grated Parmesan cheese, sliced onion and cherry tomatoes.


Strawberries

Essential vitamins, fiber, potassium and phytochemicals. One serving of strawberries – about 8 strawberries – is an excellent source of vitamin C. One serving of strawberries provides more vitamin C than an orange!
In a recent study, strawberries ranked second among the top ten fruits in antioxidant capacity (TAC), which is one reason why they may help prevent cancer and heart disease.
1 cup strawberries (147 grams)= 50 calories, 0 fat, 0 sodium, 2 grams dietary fiber, 170 mg potassium, 11 g carbohydrate, 160 percent vitamin C.


Sweet California Cherries

Stemilt Bing Cherry season starts in California and moves to Washington State by end of June, sweet and yummy!
Look for cherries that are plump with firm, smooth, and brightly colored skins. Good quality cherries should have green stems attached.

  • Keep refrigerated
  • Cherries do not ripen further after harvest.
  • Cherries bruise easily; so handle with care.

Cherries are:

  • Low Fat
  • Saturated Fat Free
  • Sodium Free
  • Cholesterol Free
  • Good Source of Fiber
  • Good Source of the antioxidant Vitamin C

1 cup cherries (21 cherries) (140 grams) = 90 calories, 0.5 g fat, 0 sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 22 g carbohydrate, 2 g protein, 300 mg potassium, 15 percent daily value for vitamin C, 2 percent daily value for vitamin A, calcium and iron.


Tomatoes on the Vine

  • Botanically, tomatoes are a fruit. This is because, generally, a fruit is the edible part of the plant that contains the seeds, while a vegetable is the edible stems, leaves, and roots of the plant.
  • Significant medical research suggests that the consumption of lycopene – the stuff that makes tomatoes red – may prevent cancer.
  • Store on the countertop. Tomatoes will continue to ripen.
  • Low Fat
  • Low Calorie
  • Saturated Fat Free
  • Sodium Free
  • Cholesterol Free
  • High in the antioxidant Vitamin C
  • Good Source of the antioxidant Vitamin A

Washington State Apples

Apples provide about 7 to 8 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin C, and they offer much more. Apples are a good source of dietary fiber and a major source of several antioxidant phytochemicals. Studies suggest that these natural substances found in apples may prevent cell damage that leads to cancer, and may prevent damage to blood vessels that leads to heart disease. It is important to eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables as part of a healthy lifestyle.
1 medium apple (154 grams/5.5 ounces) = 80 calories, 0 fat, 0 protein, 0 sodium, 22 g carbohydrate, 5 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar, 8 percent daily value vitamin C, 170 mg potassium


Washington State Pears

If purchased unripe – store on the countertop in closed paper bag for 1-3 days. If already ripe – refrigerate. Continues to ripen after harvest. Serve whole fresh pears for out-of-hand snacking, it’s a refreshing after school snack with peanut butter. Slice fresh pears into fruit salads or poach whole pears for a light dessert.

  • Low Fat
  • Saturated Fat Free
  • Sodium Free
  • Cholesterol Free
  • Good Source of Fiber
  • Good Source of the antioxidant Vitamin C

Nutrition Facts for 1 Pear:

  • Serving Size 1 medium (166g)
  • Calories 100, Total Fat 1g, Sodium 0mg, Total Carbohydrate 25g (Dietary Fiber 4g, Sugars 17g), Protein 1g
  • Vitamin C: 10 percent
  • Calcium 2: percent